Trauma

EMDR stands for Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. That’s a mouthful, for sure. It means moving your eyes in a rapid yet rhythmic way while recalling a traumatic event. Doing so helps reduce the intensity of your emotions and sometimes the bodily sensations you associate with that event. The therapist will guide you to shift…

< Read More >

EMDR References List of international guidelines and organizations recognizing the effectiveness of EMDR. American Psychiatric Association (2004).   Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Stress Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association Practice Guidelines. EMDR is recommended as an effective treatment for trauma. Bleich, A., Kotler, M., Kutz, I., & Shalev,…

< Read More >

This is a podcast that was originally aired on the “Functional Medicine Doc Show,” which is hosted by Dr. Carri Drzyzga. It is an easy to listen podcast that covers the basics of EMDR, how it works, and what it can be used for. Dr. DaLene is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, and licensed Professional Clinical Counselor. She is a Certified Eating Disorder Specialist, an expert in traumatic stress, and is certified in EMDR. She has a private practice specializing in the treatment of eating…

< Read More >

It may feel like your trauma symptoms come “out of the blue” but often they arise because of a trigger. To begin learning how to cope with triggers, it will be important to begin identifying what your triggers are. When talking about trauma, a trigger can be anything that reminds you of the trauma. It can be an object, a type of person, a place, a situation, a smell, a noise, a piece of music, or even a colour. A trigger may also be an action or particular activity you have to do…

< Read More >

Although Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was already covered by Alberta’s Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB), as of December 10, 2010, coverage for PTSD became presumptive for some of Alberta’s first responders. This means that police officers, firefighters, emergency medical technicians, and sheriffs, no longer have the burden of proving their PTSD came as a result of their work. Instead, when these first responders are formally diagnosed with PTSD by a physician or psychologist, it will…

< Read More >